Welcome to the Official Web Site of the Joint Base Cape Cod
 
 
The 102nd Intelligence Wing Supports the Local Community
with Medical Stations for Summer Events

(continued from page 1)
by Mr. Timothy D. Sandland, 102nd Intelligenc
e Wing

The 102nd Intelligence Wing has provided similar support to the community of Bourne during the summer months for the last dozen or so years. In addition to the benefit to the town, this partnership also pays dividends to members of Otis Air National Guard Base as it provides additional opportunities to train personnel on equipment that is assigned to the unit. Chief Mello went on to say "it's great to give back to the community and get out there so folks don't just see us during times of disaster."
 
Senior Airman Joseph Smolinsky tightens a grounding wire on a power-generation unit July 24, 2014 on Mashnee Rd. in Bourne, Mass. The power-unit is part of an emergency medical station that will be manned by Bourne Fire Department members during the Pan-Mass Challenge, an annual bike-a-thon that supports the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. (National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Aaron Smith/Released)
 
Chief Master Sgt. Jason Mello, of the 267th Combat Communications Squadron, and Lt. Greg Edgcomb, of the Bourne Fire Department oversee the assembly of a emergency medical station on July 24, 2014 on Mashnee Rd. in Bourne, Mass. The station is supplied by the 102nd Intelligence Wing, but will be manned by Bourne Fire Department members during the Pan-Mass Challenge, an annual bike-a-thon that supports the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. (National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Aaron Smith/Released)
 
Senior Airman Joseph Smolinsky demonstrates to Lt. Greg Edgcomb, of the Bourne Fire Department, how to operate a power-generation unit July 24, 2014 on Mashnee Rd. in Bourne, Mass. The power-unit is part of an emergency medical station that will be manned by Bourne Fire Department members during the Pan-Mass Challenge, an annual bike-a-thon that supports the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. (National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Aaron Smith/Released)
   
 
Tech. Sgt. Peter Vasconcellos explains the operation of an military air conditioning unit to Lt. Greg Edgcomb, of the Bourne Fire Department, July 24, 2014 on Mashnee Rd. in Bourne, Mass. The unit is part of an emergency medical station that will be manned by Bourne Fire Department members during the Pan-Mass Challenge, an annual bike-a-thon that supports the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.(National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Aaron Smith/Released)
 
 
 
 
 
A Different Shade of Purple
(continued from page 1)
By Staff Sgt. Jerry Saslav, Massachusetts National Guard Public Affairs

For hours, the Soldiers instructed and supervised the Cadets as they practiced before firing the rifle qualification course. While there were many who had shot in the past, there were others who had never held a firearm before.

“Safety first, it’s my biggest concern,” said Ellen Hanson.

Hanson’s triplets, age 11, all fired together. She stood in the back of the range and watched as they shot.

 “To hear [the Soldiers] remind [the Cadets] and see the kids understand and get it … and listen and pay attention,” said Hanson, “[A gun is] dangerous and you have to take all the precautions.”

Her daughter, Heather never fired a rifle before; she outshot her two brothers.
“[The SARTS team] showed me what to do. I did pretty well,” said Heather Hanson. “They told me never to point a gun at someone and to put the safety on when you aren’t shooting. [Guns] are very dangerous and they could hurt someone.”

While teaching firearms safety and marksmanship is the miss ion of these Soldiers.  They also taught something else, confidence.

“You build confidence,” said Sgt. Jasen Gonzalez, 101st Finance Detachment, Massachusetts Army National Guard, who was assisting the SARTS team. “That black circle is not just a target to them. That’s them doing something amazing … that’s an achievement. For [Soldiers], we go to the range because we have to; it’s part of our job. For them that a huge achievement … to be able to go say ‘hey, I hit the bull’s-eye’. They’re all going to go home and show their parents.”

At the end of the day all the Cadets had qualified.