Welcome to the Official Web Site of the Joint Base Cape Cod
 
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Aerial view of Cape Cod depicting location of the Joint Base Cape Cod
The Joint Base Cape Cod
(JBCC) is a full scale, joint-use base home to five military commands training for missions at home and overseas, conducting airborne search and rescue missions, and intelligence command and control.

To the right is an aerial photo of Tactical Training Base (TTB) Kelley, dedicated to SGT Michael J. Kelley. The training base replicates a forward operating base soldiers occupy when deployed overseas in places like Afghanistan. Aerial of Tactical Training Base Kelley

The sea of green in the background is the northern training area of Camp Edwards, home to the Upper Cape Water Supply Reserve; the largest piece of  protected, undeveloped land on Cape Cod. Both are used jointly for training by the Massachusetts Army and Air National Guard and the U.S. Coast Guard.

Retired F15 Eagle jet
Honoring its past mission, the 102nd Intelligence Wing has erected a retired F-15 Eagle jet for display outside the gates of Otis Air National Guard base. The current mission of the intelligence wing is to provide world-wide precision intelligence and command and control along with trained and experienced Airmen for expeditionary combat support anUS Coast Guard helicopter and fixed wing aircraft flying over Woods Hole, MAd homeland security.


U.S. Coast Guard Base Cape Cod is the Coast Guard's primary tenant command within Joint Base Cape Cod (JBCC). Established in August 2014, U.S. Coast Guard Base Cape Cod serves as the single DCMS touch point for the support of Coast Guard operations within the 1st Coast Guard District, standing shoulder-to-shoulder with operational partners to ensure the delivery of professional, responsive and cost-effective services to the American public. With the shift in support services to Base Cape Cod, all services and support oriented departments are now located at Base Cape Cod.

Air Station Cape Cod (ASCC), with its three helicopters and four jets, is the only Coast Guard Aviation facility in the northeast. ASCC is responsible for the waters from New Jersey to the Canadian border and maintains the ability to launch a helicopter and/or jet within 30 minutes of a call, 365 days-a-year, 24 hours-a-day, and in nearly any weather condition.

Soldiers training for deployment at Camp Edwards, the primary military training facility for National Camp Edwards combat soldiers training for deploymentGuard and Army Reserve soldiers throughout New England. Camp Edwards' primary mission is to prepare soldiers for combat missions overseas as well as missions to serve and protect the homeland stateside.


The JBCC supports a wide range of training for homeland defense and security missions needs for theBomb sniffing dog at Cp Edwards training for security mission various commands as well as large scale joint training exercises with both military and civilian first responder participation. The picture at the right shows bomb sniffing dogs training at Camp Edwards in May of 2010.


6th Missle Space Warning, Cape Cod Air Force Station

Cape Cod Air Force Station is the only land based radar site providing missile warning for the eastern coast of the United States and southern Canada against intercontinental and sea-launched ballistic missiles.

The JBCC is home to many other tenants and programs, to learn more please visit our Overview page.




 


News, Highlights and Events


A NEW PATH TO EDUCATION
by Timothy Sandland, 102nd Intelligence Wing

The first-ever Airman Leadership School (ALS) Course was conducted here at Otis Air National Guard Base via satellite.

The Otis Satellite site location is managed by a team of trained and dedicated facilitators led by Chief

Students attending the Satellite Airman Leadership School (ALS) Class 15-2 from the 102nd Intelligence Wing, Otis Air National Guard Base, MA. This was the first ALS class held here via satellite.

Master Sgt. Jason Mello, and administrated on a day to day basis by Technical Sgt. Debra Hasley. They provide a valuable service to the enlisted corps of the base.

As pointed out by Chief Master Sgt. of the Air Force James Cody during his visit here last month, Enlisted Professional Military Education (EPME) is critical in the development of airmen. He said "I want to make sure that there is an opportunity for every single airman in the United States Air Force, regardless of component, to be able to attend in-residence Airman Leadership School - distance learning needs to be available because there are circumstances where you can't get somebody into an [in-residence] class".

To put the challenge of routing the Air Force's airmen through EPME into perspective, consider that there are approximately 13,000 airmen waiting in the queue for this required career step. A number that is staggering when you consider that it is a requirement that cannot be waived.

As Chief Mello observed at last year's ANG Command Chief's Symposium, less than a quarter of attending units reported having some sort of EPME at their bases.

Students attending the Satellite Airman Leadership School (ALS) Class 15-2 from the 102nd Intelligence Wing, Otis Air National Guard Base, MA. This was the first ALS class held here via satellite.

So, where do airmen get this training if not via satellite at their home base? They fight for training slots at their closest Air Force schoolhouse. Typically there are not a lot of quotas available for guardsmen as the class sizes are typically not very large and there are plenty of regular Air Force and Reserves personnel waiting to fill them. One of the challenges that Active Duty airmen face is that they have a requirement to attend the course in-residence. That, along with impending High Year of Tenure and ETS timelines gives the full-time force priority by default at their closest Air Force schoolhouse. Typically there are not a lot of quotas available for guardsmen as the class sizes are typically not very large and there are plenty of regular Air Force and Reserves personnel waiting to fill them. One of the challenges that Active Duty airmen face is that they have a requirement to attend the course in-residence. That, along with impending High Year of Tenure and ETS timelines gives the full-time force priority by default.

Needless to say, opportunities to attend are very competitive. (Continued at right)




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A NEW PATH TO EDUCATION
by Mr. Timothy D. Sandland
102nd Intelligence Wing



(Continued from left.)

That's where distance-learning comes in. It is the same content, the same course work, and a very similar experience to in-residence. It is an accredited course so in addition to getting a 'box filled' for your career, you also end up with college credits.

In many ways distance-learning can actually be better because it reinforces time-management skills. Students in the distance-learning classroom, unlike their in-residence counterparts, typically work all day, go home to family each night, but also have to balance their classroom and after-class work. It takes real commitment to take on this kind of work load but it is well worth it.

The seeds for a locally-grown ALS course were planted back in early 2013 when Sgt. Hasley recognized the need. After getting the necessary buy-in from the leadership and the green light from the schoolhouse at McGhee-Tyson ANGB, the dominoes were set into motion to stand up a site.

Shortly after, in May 2013, the Instructor Certification Course Mobile Training Team from McGhee-Tyson arrived to provide the Instructor Certification Program (ICP). This is necessary and required for all instructors and facilitators. The training prepared our facilitators for the duties they would face during the molding of our young airmen and it ultimately allows Otis to be a remote site.

In addition to Chief Mello and Technical Sgt. Hasley, Senior Master Sgts. Leonard Perkins and Beth Hernandez, Master Sgt. Sean Sullivan, and Technical Sgts. Richard Hamel and John Casey are trained and qualified course facilitators.

Facilitators are the key with distance learning. They serve to keep the classroom under control, act as advisors to the students, perform many of the administrative tasks that are critical to keep things running smoothly, and are an extension of the instructor. Although they aren't full-fledged instructors, they are able to lead discussions, guide, and advise students on their projects.

Chief Mello reflected on the reason he volunteers his time the program, "we owe it to our airmen to give back to them." A sentiment likely shared with the rest of the facilitators as they all put in their time, above and beyond their jobs, to make sure students get the best available support and education.

With upwards of 12 remote sites and 8-14 students at each, the instructors at McGhee-Tyson have their hands full. The facilitators are an important part of the classroom structure - the process wouldn't flow nearly as smoothly without them.

The satellite portion of the class consisted of five weeks of weekend classes (both Saturdays and Sundays) for a total of 10 training days. Students performed all of the same tasks and assignments as their in-residence counterparts, including drill and ceremonies, completion of lessons, and submission of individual and group projects.

Written assignments were submitted using SharePoint on the Air Force Portal. The cloud-based service allows for quick and efficient dissemination of lesson guides, changes and announcements, and of course submission of assignments.

Upon completion of the five week satellite portion of ALS, students traveled to McGhee-Tyson to complete the in-residence portion of the school.
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