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Kenneth Elmore speaks to Guard Members for MLK Breakfast Celebration 
 
Mr. Kenneth Elmore, Dean of Students at Boston University 

MILFORD, Mass. – Mr. Kenneth Elmore, Dean of Students at Boston University, speaks about Martin Luther King Jr. during a breakfast honoring King’s birthday, here, Jan 20, 2012. Elmore practiced law in the Boston area, specializing in legal issues involving education. A native of Brooklyn, NY, Elmore has over twenty years experience in higher education administration.  A graduate of Brown University, Boston University and the New England School of Law, Elmore previously served as associate director in the Office of Residence Life at Boston University for over eleven years.   (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Jeremiah J. Clark, Massachusetts National Guard)



MILFORD, M
ass. –
Maj. Gen. Joseph C. Carter, The Adjutant General, Massachusetts National Guard, and Kenneth Elmore, Dean of Students at Boston University, cut the Martin Luther King Jr Birthday cake at a breakfast honoring King’s birthday, here, Jan 20, 2012.

“Dr. Martin Luther King’s service was not based upon animosity toward these American ideals; rather, like each of us, he believed in them so strongly that he was willing to sacrifice of himself so that those treasured values would be shared with every citizen without regard to race, color, creed or station in life,” said Carter. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Jeremiah J. Clark, Massachusetts National Guard)

By Army Sgt. Jeremiah J. Clark, Massachusetts National Guard Public Affairs  

MILFORD,
Mass.
The Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday commemorates the life and heritage of a man who brought optimism to America at a time when racial segregation threatened to rip the country apart.

“Dr. Martin Luther King’s service was not based upon animosity toward these American ideals; rather, like each of us, he believed in them so strongly that he was willing to sacrifice of himself so that those treasured values would be shared with every citizen without regard to race, color, creed or station in life,” said Maj. Gen. Joseph C. Carter, The Adjutant General, Massachusetts National Guard, while attending the Joint Force Headquarters, Martin Luther King’s Breakfast, here, Jan. 20, 2012.

Furthermore, King’s inspired a nation with his actions.

“As we remember Jefferson, Madison and all the framers and the founders of this Republic as revolutionaries and visionaries; we can now recall along with them, today and every day, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. for his work that so forcefully inspired and motivated this nation to live up to the courage of its convictions,” said Carter.

To celebrate such a great man, Joint Forces Headquarters and the Massachusetts Federal Diversity Group invited Mr. Kenneth Elmore, Dean of Students at Boston University, to speak about King.

“Dean Elmore is known for his interest in issues of community development and social injustice and is known to motivate students to explore those topics through the myriad of programs and initiatives sponsored by his office,” said Carter.

Elmore practiced law in the Boston area, specializing in legal issues involving education. A native of Brooklyn, NY, Elmore has over 20 years experience in higher education administration.  A graduate of Brown University, Boston University and the New England School of Law, Elmore previously served as associate director in the Office of Residence Life at Boston University for over 11 years. 

The focus of Martin Luther King’s Birthday celebration has changed over the years and has become more focused on two things, said Mr. Thomas Desmond, State Equal Employment Manager, Joint Force Headquarters. One is public service, which falls into what King talked about and that’s one area stressed in the new focus.  The second is turning the celebration into a forum for teaching; this year’s concentrated on unifying what King did to the modern day struggle.

Elmore gave a speech that gave new meaning of Martin Luther King’s day for some and left a lasting impression on many.

“It’s a chance to have people reflect and think about the people that came before us so much of what we’re able to do today was because of the actions they did for us,” said Desmond. “They passed the torch to us and we will pass it to the younger generations.”

1/20/2012